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Friday Detours: 3rd July 2020

This week: the ‘real’ new Land Rover Defender, a 3D-printed vegan steak, the timeless appeal of the campfire, a Brecon Beacons microadventure and a closer look at a recent Antarctic ‘first’….

3rd July 2020 | Words by Matt Jones @ WildBounds HQ


#1 Ineos Grenadier revealed
When Land Rover announced they would retire the iconic Defender in 2016, there was a public outcry. Earlier this year, JLR launched the new Defender – but both the styling and the pricing have been divisive. This week, a new rival has been unveiled: the Ineos Grenadier, backed by British billionaire Sir Jim Ratcliffe, and touted as the ‘real’ spiritual successor to the venerable Defender. Take a look…

#2 Future food
A new food-tech start-up is producing plant-based, vegan-friendly steaks with the texture and appearance of real beef. Each steak takes around 20 minutes to make, using a 3D printer to mimic the appearance and texture of a beef steak

#3 Fire in our hearts
Ever wondered why humans will always be drawn to campfires? They’re a primal connection to our wildest selves. This essay for Outside magazine explains it all – and even chucks in a deliciously simple Boy Scout-style recipe for campfire cake, cooked in an orange. Read it and get lit.   



#4 Paddling the Dragon’s Breath
Anyone who knows the Brecon Beacons understands that, though it’s Pen y Fan, Corn Du and Cribyn that get all the attention, the park’s hidden gems are all in its wilder western half. In this glorious SUPing microadventure, John Summerton walks the Carmarthen Fans and discovers the mist-soaked majesty of Llyn y Fan Fach for Sidetracked magazine.

#5 The ethics of polar exploration
American explorer and adventurer Colin O’Brady hit the headlines in late 2018 when he claimed to have made the world’s first solo and unassisted ski crossing of Antarctica. Since then, however, those claims have come under scrutiny, raising questions about the ethics of modern exploration. National Geographic tries to unravel fact from fiction.  

 


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